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Salem as Frontier Outpost: Life in Seventeenth Century Salem
Primary Sources

Theme: Salem as Place
Topic: Salem as Frontier Outpost: Life in Seventeenth Century Salem
Date: Summer 2004

Primary Sources from Partner Collections
Primary Sources from Local Archives and Collections
Additional Primary Sources Used in Content and Follow-up Sessions

Sources selected and annotated by SALEM in History Staff and Emerson Baker, Ph.D. Chair, Department of History, Salem State College.


Primary Sources from Partner Collections

Deed to Lynn, 1685. Phillips Library, Peabody Essex Museum.

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Primary Sources from Local Archives and Collections

Deeds

 

These deeds were created by colonists during the 1680s in order to prove their claim and right to the Massachusetts Bay Colony. Town leaders sought out local Native Americans who signed land deeds that acknowledged colonial ownership of land. Despite these efforts, in 1684 Great Britain annulled the company's charter, which was reorganized under a royal charter in 1691.

 

Deed to Salem, 1686. Salem Town Hall, Salem, MA.

Transcript available from tthe Clerk's office at Salem's Town Hall. Available at Registry of Deeds, Vol. 7, folio 88: 497. Also online at: http://www.hawthorninsalem.org/images/fullpageimage.php?name+MMD683 [viewed 1 July 2006].

Deed to Salem, 1687. Registry of Deeds, Salem, MA. Vol. 7, folio 125: 629.

 

Newspaper Articles
These articles may be located on microfilm or in the Salem Room vertical files at the Salem Public Library .

 

In 1930, a recreation of structures believed to represent colonial architecture were constructed in Forest River Park, Salem as the backdrop for celebrations (and theatrical performances) commemorating the 1630 arrival of John Winthrop.  Following the event, Salem and Essex county determined to preserve the site, and founded Pioneer Village, the first “living history museum” in the United States.  Flagging efforts to preserve and reopen Pioneer Village have not been successful as of January 2007.

"Good Ship 'Arabella' is Scheduled to Make Appearance at 3 p.m." Salem Evening News 12 June 1930.

Gershman, Dave. "City Sees Bright Future for Pioneer Village." Salem Evening News 19 December 2003.

Goff, John. "The Next Frontier" Portfolio (Spring 2004): 12-14.

 

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Additional Primary Sources Used in Content and Follow-up Sessions


Maps

 

de Champlain, Samuel.  Cart Geographique de la Nouvelle Franse... faict en 1612.  Online at: http://www.usm.maine.edu/~maps/exhibit2/sec2.htm [viewed 1 July 2004].

Full map and details showing coast of New England and Native Americans

Foster, John.  A Map of New England, 1677.  Online at: http://www.usm.maine.edu/~maps/exhibit2/28.jpg [viewed 1 July 2004].

Also available at the Phillips Library, Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA. Call number 912.74 / H87.1

Smith, John.  New England The Most Remarkqueable parts... , 1616. Online at: http://www.usm.maine.edu/~maps/exhibit2/26.jpg [viewed 1 July 2004].

Also available at the Phillips Library, Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA.  Call number 912.74/S65.2

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